Tag Archives: Flickr

Leveraging Your Reputation: Stay connected on vacation

Tom Ciesielka is President of TC Public Relations (www.tcpr.net). Tom has over 25 years of marketing and public relations experience, working with individual lawyers and midsize law firms. He is also a former board member of the Legal Marketing Association in Chicago and has spoken at Chicago Bar Associations CLE programs. Reach him at tc@tcpr.net.

You’re going on vacation: time to relax! And time to promote! You can still enjoy your vacation and do simple things to stay connected with other people while maintaining your personal publicity plan. It won’t feel like work and won’t take much effort either. Here are some easy ways to keep yourself in front of others when you’re off the clock:

Restaurant reviews. If you haven’t created an account at Yelp, then now is the time to do it, before you go on vacation. People all over the country and beyond, such as in Canada and some European countries, post their opinions about restaurants and rate them, and the site is easy to use. When you go to a restaurant that you like, write a review at Yelp, and let other people know about it through a link that you can email, send by phone, or post anywhere online.

Recommendations. In addition to restaurants, tell other people about a good hotel that you’re staying at, a must-see tourist attraction, or a unique store that you’ve encountered. Sometimes you don’t even need any words; you can simply post a picture of your location to recommend a place. For instance, if you’re staying at a tropical resort, you can just post a picture and say, “Here’s where I am now,” instead of trying to describe it with text.

Photos. An obvious way to talk about your vacation is through photos of your trip. You can post them many places online, including Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Posterous, Picplz, and Flickr, and some of those sites can be linked to each other, so you only have to post the pictures at one place, and they will be dispersed among the network that you choose. But remember to post pictures sparingly because people will feel overwhelmed with too many photos. Choose the best ones and add an entertaining caption to keep people interested.

Observations. When you are on your trip and see anything fascinating, or if you’ve had a memorable experience that you want to share, write something at your LinkedIn or Twitter account (or both, if you have linked them up). But write something compelling and personal, so that your personality comes through. For instance, instead of writing “I just had some great ice cream,” write “Handmade banana chocolate ice cream: worth the calories. Now time to burn it off in the clear blue sea.” It tells a story, shows your beautiful location, and reveals something about you.

Do whatever makes you feel comfortable and don’t put too much pressure on yourself to post as much as possible. After all, it’s time to relax and enjoy a break from work. But it doesn’t hurt to maintain your communication with others, at least once a day.

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Leveraging Your Reputation: 3 things you can do to boost your publicity

Tom Ciesielka is President of TC Public Relations (www.tcpr.net). Tom has over 25 years of marketing and public relations experience, working with individual lawyers and midsize law firms. He is also a former board member of the Legal Marketing Association in Chicago and has spoken at Chicago Bar Associations CLE programs. Reach him at tc@tcpr.net.

How busy are you right now? Hopefully you’re not too busy to still think about your own publicity, and to actually do something about it. Here are a few things you can do right now, without even leaving your computer:

1 – Share a helpful article online. Every day we find interesting articles and websites that would be helpful to other people, but sometimes it doesn’t occur to us to share them, or we think that we don’t have the time. But it really doesn’t take much time, and by sharing with others, it helps keep your name at the top of people’s minds. Post a link to the story or website on your Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook account, or e-mail it to someone who might benefit from it. If the link is too long, you can shorten it at Ow.ly, (http://ow.ly), Bit.ly (http://bit.ly), or Tinyurl.com (http://tinyurl.com).

2 – Post photos. If you’ve spoken at an event, gone to an interesting place, or even if you’ve seen interesting things around town, choose a couple of photos that you think people would be interested in. Then post them on your Flickr, Facebook, blog, or other online account where you share photos. Even busy people will take the time to look at a photo. Just make sure it’s not too big so that the photo will easily load on people’s computers or phones. You can use Picnik.com (http://www.picnik.com) to edit your photo for free.

3 – Congratulate someone. A lot of people do incredible things, but not everyone bothers to recognize what they do. You can stand out from the crows by letting others know that you’ve noticed their accomplishments. If you’ve heard about a promotion, or have read someone’s article, write a congratulatory email. It’s a simple way to connect with other people in a positive way and to keep your name out there.

Try at least one of these tips—after all, they cost nothing and don’t take much time. The more you do to communicate with others in these ways, you’ll feel like your publicity plan is easier to manage.

PR-Induced Firm Growth

Tom Ciesielka is President of TC Public Relations (www.tcpr.net). Tom has over 25 years of marketing and public relations experience, working with individual lawyers and mid-sized law firms. He is also a former board member of the Legal Marketing Association in Chicago and has spoken at Chicago Bar Associations CLE programs.  Reach him at tc@tcpr.net.

A public relations plan executed properly can propel your firm to the peak of prosperity (how’s that for alliteration?). The communications industry has been around for a long time, although its true value is not always realized. In addition to managing your firm’s reputation and highlighting your cases in the media, the goal of public relations is to ultimately increase your firm’s business. And it is possible.

Getting online.

Of course getting situated online is no longer an option— the current age demands it. Why? Because it’s where your current and potential clients are. Expanding your online presence takes time to make connections, build a following and capitalize on strong new business leads. It won’t happen overnight, but the leads are out there. Think about all the platforms available that you can be a part of: the World Wide Web as a whole through your firm’s website with a clear picture of who you are, what you do and why you do it; a Twitter account to highlight media coverage, give real-time updates of cases, and provide links to other pages that demonstrate your expertise; Facebook to personally connect with firm “fans;” and LinkedIn to associate and connect with peers and prospects and further establish professional relationships (even ask for referrals). Also consider Flickr to share photos of firm personalities and events or Wikipedia to create a landing page of information on your firm on a third-party site.

Getting answers.

Business does not happen in a vacuum; you need to know the answers to many different questions. What are your competitors doing? How do clients view your firm? What’s happening in your firm’s industry? What’s going to happen in your firm’s industry? What are the leading media outlets in the legal industry and your practice areas? The answers to these questions are invaluable to you as you then use them to develop public relations tactics. Laying this foundation is necessary to help you develop the right messages to reach the right audiences and ultimately, reach your firm’s objectives.

Getting in front.

Complacency is the enemy of firm growth, so don’t settle for being average—get out in front of the pack. Keeping an eye on breaking industry news will help you stay in front and be one of the first to comment as an expert or thought-leader. Participate in legal industry events, either by attending or by being the featured speaker. Often times programs are planned a year in advance so remember, if you want to stay ahead, you have to think ahead. Capitalizing on these opportunities will build your reputation as an expert, give you and your firm exposure and connect you with potential clients.