Tag Archives: Books

Leveraging Your Reputation: A few tips for publicizing your book

Tom Ciesielka is President of TC Public Relations (www.tcpr.net). Tom has over 25 years of marketing and public relations experience, working with individual lawyers and midsize law firms. He is also a former board member of the Legal Marketing Association in Chicago and has spoken at Chicago Bar Association CLE programs. Reach him at tc@tcpr.net.

 If you’ve published a book, it’s important to think of ways to publicize it. Even if you’ve gotten a book published at a major company, it doesn’t guarantee that they will do much to promote it, so here are a few tips to help you get more exposure:

Target appropriate media. If you wrote a niche book, then you should be targeting niche media. Blanketing all kinds of media with press releases will lead to wasted effort and frustration, because the return will be slim. You should research what kinds of publications, shows, blogs and other outlets fit your content, then contact the specific people who would be interested. If it’s difficult to find out who has written or talked about your topic, then contact an editor or producer and explain why your book would be a good fit. Think about their audience: Would they be interested in what you have to say? If you definitely know that they would, then communicate that you could offer something that will help or inform them.

Speak. Find opportunities to speak at organizations, your alma mater, chambers of commerce, libraries, or wherever you think would be good places for people to find out about your book. If your topic is about legal matters, approach legal societies, law schools, and even non-legal areas that you think could benefit from your expertise. Depending on who your audience is, remember to adjust your message and emphasize different parts of your book so that they will see its value.

Join an organization that is your target audience. This is related to speaking, but it takes you beyond that because you should get involved more deeply, where you’ll make connections that can lead to other opportunities to meet like-minded potential readers. You can post excerpts of your book on their website, get interviewed for their newsletter, or just be a resource. Being part of an organization will give you a base from which to work and give you the confidence you need if you’re hesitant about branching out beyond your comfort zone in the pursuit of more readers.

I have more tips that I want to share, so stay tuned…there are many ways to promote your book!

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Leveraging Your Reputation: Two ways to say thanks

Tom Ciesielka is President of TC Public Relations (www.tcpr.net). Tom has over 25 years of marketing and public relations experience, working with individual lawyers and midsize law firms. He is also a former board member of the Legal Marketing Association in Chicago and has spoken at Chicago Bar Association CLE programs. Reach him at tc@tcpr.net.

November is Thanksgiving month, so it’s a good time to think of ways to thank your clients and other people you work with. Of course, you can send them gift cards, cookies, and flowers, but there are a couple of free things that you can do to show them that you’re thankful.

Share a free ebook. An ebook doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages, and it’s not complicated to do. You can simply create a PDF of some useful information that you think clients will need, or offer a legal analysis of societal trends or prominent current events. Create content for a variety of audiences. For instance, if you have an area of expertise that other attorneys could benefit from to do their own work, then create a PDF for them with that helpful information. You can then create another PDF with tips and simple legal guidance for clients, such as explaining changes in laws that will affect them. Remember to create an ebook that is brief but contains substantial information so that people think they’re getting something of value. Once your PDF is complete, just post it on your website and share the link for download, or send the PDF directly to the people in your network.

Send a handwritten note. Andrea Nierenberg, who I’ve worked and is the Queen of Networking, has promoted this idea for years, and says that she writes three handwritten notes a day. Think about the people who have helped you recently, whether in a big or small way, and thank them with a small card and short note that is just a few lines. Today, since many people are on email, social networking sites, or on their phones, a handwritten note really stands out. When someone sees that his or her mail contains a card in the midst of catalogs, junk mail, and bills, it’s a nice surprise. It’s best to get into a daily or weekly habit of sending out thank you cards, and it doesn’t take much time: write a few when you’re having coffee or before you start working at your desk. You’ll see that people will react positively and will possibly help you even more in the future.

And don’t limit yourself to November; try these two tips throughout the year, and your reputation and network will grow.

Leveraging Your Reputation: Be an expert

Tom Ciesielka is President of TC Public Relations (www.tcpr.net). Tom has over 25 years of marketing and public relations experience, working with individual lawyers and midsize law firms. He is also a former board member of the Legal Marketing Association in Chicago and has spoken at Chicago Bar Associations CLE programs. Reach him at tc@tcpr.net.

You’ve probably been practicing law long enough to know that you are good at what you do, and should be recognized for it beyond just your coworkers, clients, and other attorneys. One way to stand out from the crowd and communicate to a wider audience is to become an expert. If you don’t want to be an expert on a national or international scale, you can be a big fish in a small pond. How big you want your sphere of influence to be is up to you.

Here are some tips to get you started:

Define Your Niche and Audience. An obvious niche is the area in which you already practice law. But can you refine that even more? Decide if you’re going to be an expert to other attorneys or if you are going to want to appeal to people outside of the legal profession. Then you can plan where you are going to share your expertise and what type of language you are going to use to communicate with them.

Prepare. Even though you already have a lot of knowledge and experience, it never hurts to get more education and to read even more so that you will be a good source of information for others. Get tips from someone who is more established in your niche, or talk to a mentor. If you don’t know anyone personally who can help, then go online and look at experts’ books and articles to read all you can. Look at what the current experts know, and see if you can add something unique or extra. Or just find out what the average person knows. You just need to know more than they do to give them helpful advice.

Break it Down. Law is a complex subject for many people. A good way to become an expert outside the legal profession is to take a complex case that you have worked on, or an important historical or current legal decision, and simplify it for people to understand. You can also explain what current laws mean in “layman’s” terms. Then post your summary online, either at your own site or someone else’s. There are also various publications that you can submit your explanation to, online or offline.

Outlets. Experts give seminars, teach classes, appear on panels, write articles, post online, publish books, go on TV and radio, have a YouTube channel, and more. Decide what outlet you want to use to display your expertise. Or do them all. The more exposure you have, the more you’ll be known, and after a while, you won’t have to put forth so much effort; people will be asking you to make an appearance or write something for their publication.

And remember: Substance still matters. Stay informed on your chosen niche, develop superior speaking and writing skills, and the combination of your helpful knowledge and experience, combined with your exposure, will make you a solid expert to whom people will turn.